Book Talk | Three Summer Reading Suggestions

Summer Reading Suggestions

For me, one of summer’s truest delights has always been the additional reading time. Nothing beats a seat in the shade with a tall glass of lemonade (or perhaps something a little stronger…) and a page-turning novel. When I was young, I took enormous pleasure in deciding what stack of books I’d read during my school-free days, and now I teach part-time I still get to take advantage of the summer holidays to knock off as many books from my TBR pile as possible.

Here are some recent reads of mine that I think would make excellent choices for the summer, whether you’re enjoying lazy evenings in the garden or need a good book for a plane.

1/ The Bookseller by Cynthia Swanson

Described as ‘Sliding Doors set in a bookshop,’ this debut novel by Cynthia Swanson instantly caught my attention. The Bookseller is set in Denver in the 1960s and is told from the perspective of Kitty Miller, a 30-something spinster who runs a bookshop with her best friend from high-school. One night, Kitty goes to sleep and wakes up to find herself in an alternate reality, where she’s living the life she always thought she wanted: married to a caring husband with piercing blue eyes and the mother of three young children. Every time she goes to sleep, Kitty dreams about this new version of herself, who knows how to cook and buys much more expensive (if rather dull) clothes.

Kitty discovers that Lars, the man she married in her dream world, is the same man who stood her up on a blind date several years ago. In real life, she finds out that Lars had died suddenly before meeting her, and her dream life shows her the path she might have taken had he lived. Kitty gets more and more drawn into her imaginary world, only to discover that her seemingly perfect other life may be far less idyllic than first appears….

The Bookseller kept me gripped right to the end, and I enjoyed its satisfying plot twist. I loved the period details, especially the descriptions of the books Kitty enjoys reading and that she stocks in her shop. This book would make an excellent light, entertaining read for a long journey. I’ve now bought a copy of Cynthia Swanson’s recently published second novel, The Glass Forest, and can’t wait to read that too.

2/ An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

I talked about An American Marriage on a recent Tea & Tattle Podcast episode, and I highly recommend adding it to your summer reading pile. Jones’ novel describes what happens to a newly wed black American couple, after the husband is arrested and wrongfully imprisoned for rape.

An American Marriage is told from the perspective of three main narrators: husband and wife Roy and Celestial and Celestial’s best friend, Andre, who’s been in love with her for years. The triangular love plot lies at the heart of the story, which deftly examines the themes of racial prejudice, familial ties, professional and creative ambition and the societal expectations of women.

I loved Jones’ full-bodied, finely honed proseĀ  and her tender understanding of people’s struggles, desires and failings. None of her characters are perfect, or indeed wholly likeable, which makes them all the more human and ultimately endearing. It’s easy to see why An American Marriage has been a firm favourite on the New York Times bestseller list, and it would make a great choice for your next holiday read.

3/ The Driver’s Seat by Muriel Spark

Muriel Spark apparently thought The Driver’s Seat her best novel, which made me very curious to read it. The book is extremely slim, so I was able to read almost all of it on a long-ish tube journey. The Driver’s Seat is a disturbing story about a character hellbent on one of the most self-destructive holidays ever imagined.

Having burst into a fit of hysteria at work, the book’s protagonist, Lise – neither young nor old, neither pretty nor plain – gets the afternoon off and goes shopping to prepare for her holiday in Italy (the destination is never specifically named, but it’s most likely Rome). She chooses an outfit of wildly clashing colours, the first of many insanity-tinged decisions she makes within the following few hours she remains alive….

In The Driver’s Seat, Muriel Spark inverts all the traditional elements of a murder mystery. The reader is aware almost from the beginning that Lise will be murdered, but Lise is no ordinary victim. It is hard, indeed, to attach the word ‘victim’ to Lise, and her engineering of events forces the reader to an uncomfortable consideration of the fine line between Lise’s complicity in her end and the horrific victimisation of her death. Reading this book feels rather like experiencing a psychedelic nightmare, but I can assure you it’s a story you’ll never forget.

~

You can keep up with my book recommendations on my books-only Instagram account, @mirandasbookcase